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Fridays for future

Fridays for future

KÆLTIA’s Team in its aim to contribute with the global awareness of the Climate Change, summarise below some critical news:

  • COVID-19 has resurrected single-use plastics – are they back to stay? Moreover, Europe’s major rivers are littered with surgical masks and medical gloves discarded by people.
  • After a storage tank in Norilsk, northern Russia, collapsed in late May, 20,000 tonnes of diesel fuel was released into the environment. Strong winds caused the oil to spread more than 12 miles from the source, contaminating nearby rivers, lakes and the surrounding soil. It could take decades to clean up.
  • Certified ‘sustainable’ palm oil fields endanger mammal habitats and biodiverse tropical forests over 30 years.
  • The world can expect more rainfall as the climate changes, but it can also expect more water to evaporate, complicating efforts to manage reservoirs and irrigate crops in a growing world, according to a Clemson University researcher whose latest work has been published in the journal Nature Communications.
  • Microplastics (MPs), i.e., tiny plastic particles less than 5 millimeters in length, can now be found throughout the ocean and other aquatic ecosystems, and even in our seafood and salt. As MPs have become ubiquitous, scientists have become concerned about the transfer of MPs from the environment to the food chain and the potential impact of MPs on human health.
  • Deforestation of the Brazilian Amazon increased by a record 25 percent year-on-year in the first half of 2020, increasing pressure on President Jair Bolsonaro to abandon his plans to develop the region. On the other hand, Colombia lost 159,000 hectares of forest—an area the size of Brazilian megacity Sao Paulo—to deforestation in 2019.
  • Global average sea surface temperatures have risen at unprecedented rates for the past three decades, with far-reaching consequences for coral reefs. Today, the majority of coral reefs are surviving at their upper thermal limit and an increase in just one degree Celsius lasting longer than a few weeks can lead to coral bleaching and death. With projections of ocean warming expected to continue to rise by as much as 1.5 degrees Celsius in this century, scientists are in a race against time to find new solutions to sustain reefs.

Via Earth News

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