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Fridays for future

Fridays for future

KÆLTIA’s Team in its aim to contribute with the global awareness of the Climate Change, summarise below some critical news:

  • Methane, the main component of natural gas, is the cleanest-burning of all the fossil fuels, but when emitted into the atmosphere it is a much more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. By some estimates, seafloor methane contained in frozen formations along the continental margins may equal or exceed the total amount of coal, oil, and gas in all other reservoirs worldwide. Yet, the way methane escapes from these deep formations is poorly understood.
  • Plastics in the ocean can release chemicals that cause deformities in sea urchin larvae, new research led by the University of Exeter shows, where the urchins developed a variety of abnormalities, including deformed skeletons and nervous systems.
  • The proliferation of pits and ponds created in recent years by miners digging for small deposits of alluvial gold in Peru’s Amazon has dramatically altered the landscape and increased the risk of mercury exposure for indigenous communities and wildlife, a new study shows.
  • China will ban all waste imports from January 1, 2021, state media reported Friday, marking the culmination of a three-year phase-out of accepting overseas junk.
  • University of Copenhagen researchers have been following vegetation trends across the planet’s driest areas using satellite imagery from recent decades. They have identified a troubling trend: Too little vegetation is sprouting up from rainwater in developing nations, whereas things are headed in the opposite direction in wealthier ones. As a result, the future could see food shortages and growing numbers of climate refugees.
  • Mongolia’s semi-arid plateau may soon become as barren as parts of the American Southwest due to a «vicious cycle» of heatwaves—that exacerbates soil drying, and ultimately produces more heatwaves—according to an international group of climate scientists.
  • Russian oil giant Rosneft on Wednesday announced the start of operations for its giant Vostok oil project in the Arctic, part of the country’s strategic energy plan which has been criticised.

Via Earth News

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