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Fridays for future

Fridays for future
  • As global temperatures continue to rise, scientists are warning the world to brace for heat waves, extreme storms, wildfires and other dire consequences. While chemists are actively searching for new ways to mitigate climate change, they are also developing technologies to allow people and ecosystems to not only survive, but thrive, in a warmer world, according to a special issue of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

 

  • Consumers are likely wasting much more food than commonly believed, according to a study published February 12, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Monika van den Bos Verma and colleagues from Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands.

 

  • In a warming world, Canada’s north may become our breadbasket of the future—but this new “farming frontier” also poses environmental threats from increased carbon emissions to degraded water quality, according to the first-ever study involving University of Guelph researchers.

 

  • The bushfires raging across Australia this summer have sharpened the focus on how climate change affects human health. This season bushfires have already claimed more than 30 human lives, and many people have grappled with smoke inhalation and mental health concerns. The changing nature of bushfires around the world is one of the tragic consequences of climate change highlighted in “Our Future on Earth, 2020″—a report published by Future Earth, an international sustainability research network. The report includes a survey of 222 leading scientists from 52 countries who identified five global risks: failure of climate change mitigation and adaptation; extreme weather events; major biodiversity loss and ecosystem collapse; food crises; and water crises.

 

  • More frequent and intense rainfall events due to climate change could cause more landslides in the High Mountain Asia region of China, Tibet and Nepal, according to the first quantitative study of the link between precipitation and landslides in the region.

 

  • The growing global crisis of plastics waste is often framed as a problem stemming from careless consumers, but a new bill introduced in the US Congress Tuesday seeks to shift the responsibility back to industry. The proposed “Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act” would be the most ambitious regulation the US plastics industry has ever seen.

 

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